Sql updating table Listen to sex chat

Generally it is not a good idea to have a table without a clustered index or PRIMARY KEY.Kalman Toth, SQL Server Training & Business Intelligence Training Administration, Programming, SSAS/SSIS/SSRS: id="ctl00_m_m_i_ctl00_gr_ctl05_bestanswerbody" class="textarea-bestanswerhidden" name="bestanswerbody" answerbody Id="4099937" / The following test shows that there is no substantial difference.

sql updating table-30

But you can also update whole sets of records at once, and in very powerful ways. For example, you can delete rows in one table depending on whether or not they exist in another table.

SQL even has a way, a relatively new addition to the standard, by which you can insert, update, and delete all at once. For example, you want to insert a new record into the DEPT table.

The past few chapters have focused on basic query techniques, all centered around the task of getting data out of a database.

This chapter turns the tables, and focuses on the following three topic areas: For ease in finding them when you need them, recipes in this chapter have been grouped by topic: all the insertion recipes come first, followed by the update recipes, and finally recipes for deleting data. It begins with the simple problem of inserting a single row.

A CREATE or DROP INDEX statement or an ALTER TABLE statement for the target table of a prepared searched update statement invalidates the prepared searched update statement.

catid | catgroup | catname | catdesc ------- ---------- ----------- ----------------------------------------- 1 | Sports | MLB | Major League Baseball 2 | Sports | NHL | National Hockey League 3 | Sports | NFL | National Football League 4 | Sports | NBA | National Basketball Association 5 | Sports | MLS | Major League Soccer 6 | Shows | Musicals | Musical theatre 7 | Shows | Plays | All non-musical theatre 8 | Shows | Opera | All opera and light opera 9 | Concerts | Pop | All rock and pop music concerts 10 | Concerts | Jazz | All jazz singers and bands 11 | Concerts | Classical | All symphony, concerto, and choir concerts (11 rows)select * from category where catid between 6 and 8; catid | catgroup | catname | catdesc ------- ---------- ----------- -------------------------------------------- 6 | Theatre | Musicals | Musical theatre 7 | Theatre | Plays | All non-musical theatre 8 | Theatre | Opera | All opera and light opera (3 rows)select * from category where catname='Shows'; catid | catgroup | catname | catdesc ------- ---------- ----------- -------------------------------------------- 6 | Theatre | Shows | 7 | Theatre | Shows | 8 | Theatre | Shows | (3 rows)In this case, the CATDESC column was set to null because no default value was defined when the table was created.

Sent from my Android phone using Touch Down ( Yes, mass INSERT is faster without index. Kalman Toth, SQL Server Training & Business Intelligence Training Administration, Programming, SSAS/SSIS/SSRS: id="ctl00_m_m_i_ctl00_gr_ctl11_bestanswerbody" class="textarea-bestanswerhidden" name="bestanswerbody" answerbody Id="4099979" / Yes, mass INSERT is faster without index. Kalman Toth, SQL Server Training & Business Intelligence Training Administration, Programming, SSAS/SSIS/SSRS: 1.

The first syntactical form, called a searched update, updates the value of one or more columns for all rows of the table for which the WHERE clause evaluates to TRUE.

Run the following commands to set the CATEGORY table data back to the original values: update category set catdesc='Broadway Musical' where category.catid in (select category.catid from category join event on category.catid = event.catid join venue on venue.venueid = event.venueid join sales on sales.eventid = event.eventid where venuecity='New York City' and catname='Musicals');select * from category order by 1; catid | catgroup | catname | catdesc ------- ---------- ----------- -------------------------------------------- 1 | Sports | MLB | Major League Baseball 2 | Sports | NHL | National Hockey League 3 | Sports | NFL | National Football League 4 | Sports | NBA | National Basketball Association 5 | Sports | MLS | Major League Soccer 6 | Shows | Musicals | Broadway Musical 7 | Shows | Plays | All non-musical theatre 8 | Shows | Opera | All opera and light opera 9 | Concerts | Pop | All rock and pop music concerts 10 | Concerts | Jazz | All jazz singers and bands 11 | Concerts | Classical | All symphony, concerto, and choir concerts (11 rows)update category set catid=100 from event where event.catid=category.catid; select * from category order by 1; catid | catgroup | catname | catdesc ------- ---------- ----------- -------------------------------------------- 1 | Sports | MLB | Major League Baseball 2 | Sports | NHL | National Hockey League 3 | Sports | NFL | National Football League 4 | Sports | NBA | National Basketball Association 5 | Sports | MLS | Major League Soccer 10 | Concerts | Jazz | All jazz singers and bands 11 | Concerts | Classical | All symphony, concerto, and choir concerts 100 | Shows | Opera | All opera and light opera 100 | Shows | Musicals | Musical theatre 100 | Concerts | Pop | All rock and pop music concerts 100 | Shows | Plays | All non-musical theatre (11 rows) Note that the EVENT table is listed in the FROM clause and the join condition to the target table is defined in the WHERE clause. These four rows are the rows whose CATID values were originally 6, 7, 8, and 9; only those four categories are represented in the EVENT table: Update the original 11 rows in the CATEGORY table by extending the previous example and adding another condition to the WHERE clause.

Because of the restriction on the CATGROUP column, only one row qualifies for the update (although four rows qualify for the join).

Many times, however, it is more efficient to use a set-based approach to create new rows.