What is speed dating format

Meet the innovations Every group will be simultaneously introduced to a range of the latest innovations for 10 minute sessions.Each group will rotate clockwise after each session until they have met every provider.Participants may change to another table in the room.

This process continues until everyone in one group has met everyone in the other group.

The goal, for translational research as for dating, is to find a match.

After the end of each session, participants will quickly alternate their seating arrangements to pair up with their next networking opportunity.

This process will continue until all participants have interacted with each other.

The Weill Cornell Medical College Clinical and Translational Science Center (CTSC), headed by Julianne Imperato-Mc Ginley, took a novel approach to overcoming the challenge of forming scientific relationships: We organized a "speed networking" event that brought together researchers from CTSC's institutions--Weill Cornell Medical College, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, the Hospital for Special Surgery, Hunter College, and Cornell University--and from three New York-area community hospitals.

Our so-called Translational Research Bazaar, which took place in October, used a format popularized by speed dating: Two groups of people--in this case, basic scientists and clinical/translational researchers--sit on opposite sides of a table and chat for a few minutes until a bell rings, signaling that it's time to move on and strike up a new conversation.

In just a few minutes, participants will share business cards, history and offer new contacts with valuable information about their business.

After the official SPEED NETWORKING event is over, participants are encouraged to continue networking throughout the evening.

Finding new research partners can be a challenge for basic scientists and clinical researchers, as it may require them to step outside of their daily commitments.

But it's important: Meeting scientists from other disciplines can spark a new research idea or open the door to a solution to a problem that has seemed intractable.

More than 80 people registered for the event, and follow-ups with the attendees suggest it worked as planned: Eighty-five percent of participants said they met at least one potential collaborator, and seven pairs of researchers applied for internal pilot funding.